One Woman’s Heart-Warming Story and How It Passed a Coverage Bill

One Woman’s Heart-Warming Story and How It Passed a Coverage Bill

 

Her name is Melissa Thompson, and she was diagnosed with breast cancer after the birth of her first daughter, Poppy.

The dilemma she faced involved the future of her family, since her chemotherapy treatments would essentially render her infertile.

So she decided to take on a procedure in which she would preserve her eggs for the chance for another child in the future. However, since her infertility was tied to her cancer treatment, she was forced to pay over $10,000 to store her eggs.

After hearing this, Melissa decided to take action, and she is now responsible for the passing of House Bill 7124.

Check out the full story here.

 

New Online Fertility Calculator Designed for Breast Cancer Victims

New Online Fertility Calculator Designed for Breast Cancer Victims

 

Researchers at Melbourne University are looking to add on to the fertility calculator  they had already created  to help women with breast cancer.

This tool is designed to help women with breast cancer fully understand the repercussions that cancer treatment has on their fertility, even before they have begun the treatment.

Women have always been concerned with the effects of cancer treatment on fertility. With many different strategies and treatments available for women with breast cancer to preserve future fertility, this tool has a chance to make their treatment decisions much easier.

Dr. Zobaida Ebid from the Royal Women’s Hospital and University of Melbourne made it clear that the goal of the tool is to precisely determine the risk that specific breast cancer treatments have on future fertility. If the tool succeeds, it could eventually be used to calculate fertility risk for other types of cancer treatments as well.

“Often women are faced with having to quickly make a decision about their fertility at a time when they are already dealing with a lot of information and worry associated with their cancer diagnosis,” Dr. Ebid explains. Clearly, it is important for women to be able to make well-informed decisions when trying to balance their own health with the potential for a future family.

To make this happen, developers are using a large global database of information from past fertility-related treatments of women with breast cancer, in addition to continuing to gather relevant information.

Dangerous Plastics Leading to Miscarriage?

Dangerous Plastics Leading to Miscarriage?

A new study suggest that the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), found in common household plastics, could be causing a rise in miscarriages.

The study is not conclusive but it does show a  “the biological plausibility” said Dr. Linda Giudice, a California biochemist who is president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

With a federal grant,  Dr. Giudice and other researchers studied 115 newly pregnant women with a history of infertility or miscarriage; 68 suffed a  miscarriage and 47 had live births.  

The sample size was than divided up based on BPA found in a blood test. Women in the top quarter of the group had an 80 percent greater risk of miscarriage compared with those in the bottom group.

“It may be that women with higher BPA levels do have other risk factors” for miscarriage that might be amplified by BPA, said a Stanford University reproductive endocrinologist, Dr. Lathi.

The doctors of this study want to stress that this experiment is not a cause for an alarm but it does raise suspicions on the chemical BPA.

If you are worried about the chemical, avoid cooking food in plastic containers, limit the consumption of canned food, and avoid cashier receipts. However,  “It’s impossible to avoid it completely,” Lathi said.

Is Your Sperm Strong Enough?

Is Your Sperm Strong Enough?

Just like a woman’s biological clock ticks away with age, so does a man’s sperm count. As a matter of fact, the older you get, the more your body starts to produce more defective sperm containing DNA mutations that could harm your baby. Women are not the only ones whose complications could link to lower fertility, risk of miscarriage or increased likelihood of autism. Read these 7 things you do every day that destroys your sperm.

Now that I’ve scared you, I’ll tell you what you can do about your weak sperm. (Sorry, boys. Truth hurts.) For starters, your lifestyle and habits have a profound impact on fertility. Women are continually educated on diet, vitamins, exercise, smoking, etc. and men should be as well. Aside from improving your lifestyle, a $495 test called Seed could in the future predict the child’s risk of autism and neurological disorders as well as diagnosis possible fertility problems. Episona sends a tiny testing kit to your home and you can return your samples to its lab to await your results.

A simpler alternative is home fertility checks you can do in just minutes. The first test is to scan your balls for any bulging veins (fear not, surgery can fix this). A vein like this heats up your testicles, hurting the production of your sperm. You can also buy a test called Yo Home Sperm Test for $50 using your smartphone! You can see a live video of your swimmers in action and the test will tell you how many of them are capable of reaching an egg.

Low Income + High Fertility = Less education

Low Income + High Fertility = Less education

 

As a low income country, Papua New Guinea struggles with providing children with the proper amount of care.

Lack of income is significantly impacting on the health and education of the nation’s children.

“For a lot of low income countries, it takes young adults a long time to really find good jobs and be contributing members to their economies so you have this very large group that is costly” said Andrew Mason, an expert in population, health and economic studies.

He continues, describing  the government must focus on establishing reproductive health programs widely available to anybody who wants them. This includes programs devoted to infant child health, maternal mortality and reproduction services.

Fertility Treatments to Familiarize Yourself With

Fertility Treatments to Familiarize Yourself With

Fertility treatments can be a tough battle for many women who’ve done it for years. Infertility is defined as a woman attempting to conceive by engaging in regular intercourse. If the woman is younger than 35 and has been unsuccessful for a year, then treatments are recommended. Treatment is recommended for women over 35 with six months of unsuccessful pregnancies. There are many factors that affect your fertility such as the time of year, your partner and even your pets.

There are many treatments designed although the amount of information to take in about each and every one can be overwhelming. Read this break down of fertility treatments you need to be familiar with.

This is the Easiest Way to Get Pregnant

This is the Easiest Way to Get Pregnant

 

What is the easiest way to get pregnant these days? It seems like infertility is becoming more and more of an issue, as alternative forms of conception are becoming increasingly popular. Now, science tells us what the safest way to conceive really is.

A new 12-year study in the U.S. explored the relationship between test-tube fertility procedures and the effects on the female patients involved. The results? Extremely positive! While the procedures may seem scary at first, data has proven IVF to be one of the most risk free ways to conceive.

Continue reading about this break-through research here.

What You Need to Know About Fertility After 35

What You Need to Know About Fertility After 35

A woman’s fertility gradually starts to decline around age 27 and drops off dramatically after 35. By age 30, chances of miscarriage has risen to 20%. These are some scary statistics for those of you trying to have a baby in your mid thirties. It’s important to be aware of the decline your ability to conceive a healthy pregnancy and realize that you may need some help along the way.

This has nothing to do with your lifestyle and you’re not to blame for fertility fail, it’s a way of life. Eggs are naturally more fragile than they were even just a few years before. Although, you’re more vulnerable to facing health problems as you get older such as obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure that can affect your chances of getting pregnant. When older moms do conceive, their babies have a higher chance of having a birth defect such as Down Syndrome.

This isn’t true for every woman though. Women in their 20’s may struggle for years whereas it could be smooth sailing for a woman in her 40’s. However, if you know you want a family, it’s best to start trying by your early 30’s. If you aren’t at that point in your life where you’re comfortable to raise a baby, then take there are necessary steps you could take as a precaution. Maintain good health and even freeze your eggs to increase your odds when you are ready to take that step.

Waiting for IVF Treatments

Waiting for IVF Treatments

One of the biggest factors playing into fertility is the woman’s age which is often overlooked. Women who get pregnant in their 50’s or early 60’s are likely freezing their eggs or getting donor eggs from a woman in her 20’s. IVF works amazingly for many women but sadly, not all. IVF won’t correct your fertility if you’ve lost it from waiting too long to try to conceive. IVF is a medical treatment that many women need to wait to have but still won’t get public treatment. Read more about it here.

Smoking is Hurting, Not Helping

Smoking is Hurting, Not Helping

You deserve a slap on the wrist if you are smoking and attempting to conceive a baby. There are many reasons to quit smoking and having a baby is #1. Smoking contributes to infertility strains in both men and women, and if you’re lucky enough to get pregnant, the health of your baby will be impacted before and after birth if you continue to smoke. According to the CDC, your baby will receive more oxygen after just one day of not smoking. Women may face ovulation problems, increased risk of miscarriage, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and much more. Read more about the dangers of smoking while trying or pregnant here.