Is There a Link Between Fertility Treatments and Divorce Rates?

Is There a Link Between Fertility Treatments and Divorce Rates?

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A common fear among couples considering fertility treatments is that the treatments may put unwanted stress on their relationship. Many couples worry that this stress could ultimately lead to a divorce. However, despite the findings of a 2014 study that seemed to agree with this fear, a new study has found no relation between IVF treatments and divorce rates.

Dr. Mariana Martins and colleagues, from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Porto in Portugal, conducted their study from 1994 to 2009 on over 40,000 Danish women undergoing fertility treatments. The study followed the women and the development of their relationship with their partners over a 16 year period. These women were compared to a control group taken from the general population.

Over the course of the study, 65 percent of the couples undergoing treatments had a child and 20 percent of the women in the study filed for divorce. Ultimately, the study found that women undergoing fertility treatments and the women in the control group were at the same risk of separation from their partners. Dr. Martins said, “Our results will be reassuring for couples who have had or are contemplating IVF.”

While this study and its researchers do not agree with previous studies that fertility treatments can lead to divorce, they do agree that the treatments can put stress on a couple. However, they believe that this stress can actually serve to bring a couple closer together. “We also know that despite all the strain that this infertility can bring, going through [fertility treatments] can actually bring benefit to a couple’s relationship, because it forces them to improve communication and coping strategies.”

Dr. Martins and her colleagues are hopeful that their study can help calm the minds of couples seeking IVF treatment.

Fertility Coverage for Veterans Continues, Thanks to the Wounded Warrior Project

Fertility Coverage for Veterans Continues, Thanks to the Wounded Warrior Project

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Many veterans have the dream to start a family, and it is still possible because of the Wounded Warrior Project’s efforts. With everything that veterans go through in times of war, it is not uncommon to see their injuries affect their ability to start families.

It is nice to see that efforts are still being made to keep the support alive. Lt. Gen. Mike Linnington, the CEO of WWP, said that every wounded veteran deserves the opportunity to pursue the dream of starting a family. “We encourage the Appropriations Committee to approve the continuation of this fertility coverage … as we honor our commitment to those who have given so much to this country.”

Learn more about the WWP here.

Get Your Hands on This Must-Read Fertility Handbook

Get Your Hands on This Must-Read Fertility Handbook

Dr. Mary Wingfield, professor and consultant obstetrician/gynecologist at Dublin’s National Maternity Hospital wrote an incredible handbook to help couples be aware of common misinformation backed with evidence from real cases.

This article breaks down the sections of the book and gives you a quick overview of what you can expect from this handbook. With a straightforward writing style, Dr. Wingfield gives advice about lifestyle, biology, and common fertility problems and treatments. It’s a great all in one source for learning about fertility.

Get the book here.

What Do You Value More: Fertility or Sanity

What Do You Value More: Fertility or Sanity

 

Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) is a rare, but stronger form of PMS for about 3.5% of all women.

Some of the symptoms include depression, anxiety, or even thoughts of suicide in extreme cases. This disorder can be very difficult for the women who have it, and as of right now, the only known way to get rid of PMDD is through a hysterectomy, which inevitably causes infertility.

So now that brings us back to the original question? Do you care more about your own mental health or about your future family? If you or someone you know is struggling with PMDD, make sure that they talk to their doctor and also read more about it here.

Are You at the Best Age to Have Kids?

Are You at the Best Age to Have Kids?

 

Thirty, flirty and thriving. So you’ve reached your 30’s, and you’ve finally decided you’re ready to start a family. Are you at the best age to have kids? What happens when you wait this long? Is it too late? Is your fertility impacted?

The Centers for Disease Control confirms that today, more women are having kids in their early 30’s than in their late 20’s. There are many factors for why this is true. Environment, marriage, careers, all sorts of influences. The question is, how is age affecting fertility?

Continue on to the article here.

What to Avoid When You’re Trying to Conceive

What to Avoid When You’re Trying to Conceive

 

Trying to conceive can feel like an uphill battle, but what if some simple lifestyle changes could possibly help you get pregnant? Here is a list of 11 things to avoid if you are attempting to conceive.

 

1. Smoking

It comes as no surprise that smoking is not good for you, but did you know that smoking can increase the chances of genetic abnormalities in women’s eggs? Smoking doesn’t just affect female fertility either. Men who smoke have a lower sperm count and more sperm abnormalities. If you are trying to have a baby, kicking this habit can be helpful.

2. Caffeine

While you do not need to cut caffeine out of your diet entirely, it is a good idea to cut back.  Heavy caffeine consumption has been linked to fertility issues and can also cause health issues once you actually become pregnant.

3. Binge Drinking

Skipping that daily happy hour trip can help reduce several fertility issues linked to heavy drinking. Drinking to excess, which is considered more than two drinks per day, has been linked to irregular periods, ovulation problems, and abnormal hormone levels.

4. Extreme Weight

Being extremely overweight or extremely underweight can greatly affect your fertility.  It’s important to be at a healthy weight in order to be able to conceive and have a subsequent healthy pregnancy.

  

Want to see what other things to avoid when you are trying to conceive? Keep reading here.

New Online Fertility Calculator Designed for Breast Cancer Victims

New Online Fertility Calculator Designed for Breast Cancer Victims

 

Researchers at Melbourne University are looking to add on to the fertility calculator  they had already created  to help women with breast cancer.

This tool is designed to help women with breast cancer fully understand the repercussions that cancer treatment has on their fertility, even before they have begun the treatment.

Women have always been concerned with the effects of cancer treatment on fertility. With many different strategies and treatments available for women with breast cancer to preserve future fertility, this tool has a chance to make their treatment decisions much easier.

Dr. Zobaida Ebid from the Royal Women’s Hospital and University of Melbourne made it clear that the goal of the tool is to precisely determine the risk that specific breast cancer treatments have on future fertility. If the tool succeeds, it could eventually be used to calculate fertility risk for other types of cancer treatments as well.

“Often women are faced with having to quickly make a decision about their fertility at a time when they are already dealing with a lot of information and worry associated with their cancer diagnosis,” Dr. Ebid explains. Clearly, it is important for women to be able to make well-informed decisions when trying to balance their own health with the potential for a future family.

To make this happen, developers are using a large global database of information from past fertility-related treatments of women with breast cancer, in addition to continuing to gather relevant information.

Fertility Treatments to Familiarize Yourself With

Fertility Treatments to Familiarize Yourself With

Fertility treatments can be a tough battle for many women who’ve done it for years. Infertility is defined as a woman attempting to conceive by engaging in regular intercourse. If the woman is younger than 35 and has been unsuccessful for a year, then treatments are recommended. Treatment is recommended for women over 35 with six months of unsuccessful pregnancies. There are many factors that affect your fertility such as the time of year, your partner and even your pets.

There are many treatments designed although the amount of information to take in about each and every one can be overwhelming. Read this break down of fertility treatments you need to be familiar with.

Smoking is Hurting, Not Helping

Smoking is Hurting, Not Helping

You deserve a slap on the wrist if you are smoking and attempting to conceive a baby. There are many reasons to quit smoking and having a baby is #1. Smoking contributes to infertility strains in both men and women, and if you’re lucky enough to get pregnant, the health of your baby will be impacted before and after birth if you continue to smoke. According to the CDC, your baby will receive more oxygen after just one day of not smoking. Women may face ovulation problems, increased risk of miscarriage, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and much more. Read more about the dangers of smoking while trying or pregnant here.

Male Sperm Counts are Significantly Decreasing

Male Sperm Counts are Significantly Decreasing

Ladies, it’s time you pay close attention to your man’s sperm count and stop blaming yourself for your inability to conceive. Over the past 50 years, a male’s sperm count has been cut in half, hitting an all time low. In the 1940’s, sperm counts were well above 100 million sperm cells per ml dropping to about 60 million per ml in men between the ages of 18 and 19. (Yikes). So what does that mean for your chances to conceive? The good news is that appropriate lifestyle alterations can boost a man’s sperm count. Continue reading this research here.